Pat Langley, Professor, Arizona State University, School of Computing and Informatics

 

Pat Langley, Professor, Arizona State University, School of Computing and Informatics

Sage 4101

February 27, 2008 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

In this talk I review Icarus, a cognitive architecture that unifies ideas from a number of traditions. The framework supports reactive execution of routine skills, but it combines this ability with conceptual inference to ensure informed behavior, and it associates skills with goals to ensure relevant action. The architecture defaults to execution whenever an applicable skill will achieve its current goal, but it falls back on means-ends problem solving when it encounters an impasse. Moreover, successful problem solving leads to the creation of new executable skills that let the system achieve its goals more directly in the future. Thus, Icarus incorporates insights from research on human problem solving, reactive control, logical inference, and analytical learning. The architecture differs from predecessors in its focus on embodied agents, its commitment to hierarchical organizations of knowledge, and its approach to the cumulative acquisition of these structures. In closing, I review recent progress that endows the architecture with the ability to create new predicates that extend the conceptual hierarchy, to represent and use goals with temporal extent, and to generate mental projections that anticipate future events. I illustrate the framework's capabilities on tasks from an urban driving environment and report results on this and other domains.

This talk describes joint work with Dongkyu Choi, Tolga Konik, Nan Li, Daniel Shapiro, and David Stracuzzi.

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