Tim Lebo, Jason Ralph, RPI Graduate Students

 

Tim Lebo, Jason Ralph, RPI Graduate Students

Sage 4101

October 31, 2012 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Tim Lebo:

Abstract:

The World Wide Web has made it easier for academics, governments, and hobbyists to distribute data about their topics of interest. This variety of content offers a great potential for consumers to conduct their own novel explorations into topics that both affect and interest them. However, several challenges stand between the current state of practice and an uninhibited democratic data use that would benefit many. Challenges can arise at each step of the process to repurpose others' data, which includes discovery, access, integration, exploration, analysis, visualization, sharing results, and justifying results with provenance. This talk will present healthdata.tw.rpi.edu, a Linked Data site developed to respond to several developer challenges posed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which centers around 340 datasets selected by the government agency. The healthdata.tw.rpi.edu site is an application of many enabling technologies built by the Tetherless World Constellation that can be applied to similar broad-data problems. After describing some of these components and the challenge that each addresses, the talk will finish by outlining future work to enable world-wide digital communities to collaborate around common data and analyses.

 Jason Ralph:

Abstract:

Variation in performance on many cognitive tasks can be explained by considering the various control strategies used by participants.  Cognitive control varies on a continuum  from reactive to proactive, with at least two distinct brain pathway responsible for the variation.  Performance on a variety of tasks, including the AX-CPT and Sternberg Short-Term memory experiment have demonstrated that variation in control strategies can account for individual differences among various populations of subjects.  Our research focuses on the n-Back task, which is unique in that it requires both reactive and proactive elements of control in most cases.  I will discuss the preliminary results from our version of the dual n-Back task with emphasis on the control strategy adjustments necessary for accurate performance.

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