John Lindstedt/Melissa Parade, Grad Students Presentation

 

John Lindstedt/Melissa Parade, Grad Students Presentation

Sage 4101

October 16, 2013 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Melissa Parade:

Title:  How do humans perceive moving objects during locomotion?

 Abstract:

When an observer moves through a stationary environment, a pattern of visual motion is projected onto the retina, but the observer does not perceive a moving environment. When an observer fixates on a moving object, the object is located at a stationary position on the retina, but the observer does not perceive a stationary object. Rather, a moving observer generally perceives a stable environment that may also contain moving objects. This is because the visual system is able to identify and compensate for visual motion caused by locomotion in order to perceive a stable environment on the basis of visual information alone, but not with complete accuracy.  We provide evidence that the apparent inaccuracies of the compensation process are the product of experimental design. Instead, when self-motion is real and actively generated, the perception of a stable environment and the moving objects it contains is accurate. Our theory is that the environment is perceived in an Earth-fixed frame of reference during active locomotion, rather than a visual frame of reference. We stress the important roles of visual information about depth and non-visual information about self-motion while perceiving moving objects during locomotion.

 

 

John Lindstedt:

 

Title:  The Speed Factor: The Effects of Time Pressure on Expertise in Tetris

 

Abstract:

The question of how expert performance manifests in dynamic tasks with integral cognitive components dates back over a hundred years to the origins of behavioral science. Yet the nature of the trajectories over which these improvements to performance take place, and the interplay between the relevant task features and cognitive abilities employed, are still unclear. The video game Tetris is taken as an example of a complex, dynamic, and time pressured task over which humans routinely (and voluntarily) achieve mastery. This work extends previous investigations of identifying the hallmarks of expert performance in Tetris by examining the effects of one important task element, time pressure, in two ways: first, the immediate effect of removing time pressure on task performance in players of all skill levels; second, the effects that training under time pressure has on the trajectory of player performance. Future work and the expanding nature of this body of research are discussed

 

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