Discovering Addiction: The science and politics of substance abuse research

 

Discovering Addiction: The science and politics of substance abuse research

SAGE 5711

March 26, 2008 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Drug addiction stands as an intractable social problem and scientific puzzle that has taken many forms across the 20th century. What does the history of drug policy say about the ways in which scientific knowledge is and is not relevant to policy? What cultural work do drugs do in U.S. political culture? And, what is a drug—a technology of the self, an artifact with politics, a substance that when injected into a rat produces a scientific paper? What might there be to say about the sciences that have sprung up around drug-using subcultures?

   Discovering Addiction: The Science and Politics of Substance   Abuse Research (University of Michigan Press, 2007) is many   things, among them:
• A sociology of bioethics and clinical research practice
• A history of how the pharmaceutical industry conducted clinical trials of "painkillers" in the past, and how the clinical trials industry emerged from restrictions on prisoner research
• A history of primate research in a monkey colony in Michigan
• A history of human experimentation by the U.S. government and the National Academy of Sciences from 1933 to 1975
• An exploration of a bewildering succession of "laboratory logics" used to study a social problem
• A sociology of how addiction became a "chronic relapsing brain disease," and how neuro-imaging became the dominant way to study it

 

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