Bonnie E. John, Professor, Director Human-Computer Interaction Program, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Bonnie E. John, Professor, Director Human-Computer Interaction Program, Carnegie Mellon University

Sage 4101

February 20, 2008 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Abstract:
Sponsored by the Affordable Human Behavior Modeling program at ONR, the CogTool team is making predictive human behavior modeling accessible to user interface (UI) designers and developers to aid in design proposal evaluation. As the feasibility of non-psychologists creating valid models grows, and more UI designers/developers want to model, more needs for expansion of the scientific underpinnings and the way they are presented are revealed. This talk will describe the process we underwent to make modeling easy enough for non-psychologists, the science needs that we have uncovered, and our progress towards fulfilling these needs. Examples will be drawn not only from desktop computer applications, but from the design of mobile devices and airplane cockpits.

Full Paper "Predicting Interactive Search with CogTool-Explorer: An Investigation into the Order of Evaluation

Bio:
Bonnie John (B. Eng. 1977, The Cooper Union; MS 1978, Stanford; PhD, 1988 Carnegie Mellon Univeristy), has been modeling human behavior to guide HCI design since 1983. She created CPM-GOMS, which was used to save the NYNEX telephone company $2million per year (Gray, John & Atwood, 1993). Bonnie has also published models in GLEAN, Soar, EPIC-Soar and ACT-R. She was a major contributor to the chapter comparing cognitive architectures in an NRC book (Pew & Mavor, 1998). Bonnie has compared modeling across architectures and across modeling environments. Director of Carnegie Mellon's professional Masters in HCI Program and industrial consultant, Bonnie also has extensive experience in usability and design. She has brought this experience to bear on making modeling tools that are easier to use through automating substantial portions of the modeling process.

Although there is no paper directly on the topic, there are three relatively short papers that give some of the background for the talk that students might choose from. I do not have the rights to distribute all the papers directly, as that right it owned by the ACM. However, I assume RPI subscribes to the ACM Digital Library, so I have included the links to the papers and your students can download them.

The following paper was the first on CogTool. It discusses some of the usability issues we faced, the decisions we made, and the results we got.

John, B., Prevas, K., Salvucci, D., & Koedinger, K. (2004) Predictive Human Performance Modeling Made Easy. Proceedings of CHI, 2004 (Vienna, Austria, April 24-29, 2004) ACM, New York. [Download from ACM digital library]

The following paper talks about different uses of CogTool off-the-desktop and describes some examples that I will talk about as revealing science needs.
John, B. E. & Salvucci, D. D. (2005) Multi-Purpose Prototypes for Assessing User Interfaces in Pervasive Computing Systems. IEEE Pervasive Computing 4 (4), 27-34. [Download from IEEE Computer Society digital library]

The following paper is about merging CogTool with an information foraging model, SNIF-ACT, on the road to making a usable tool for evaluating the explorability of an interface. It reveals several examples of science that need to be done. I have attached this one, as it is a draft and I do have the right to distribute it.
Teo, L., & John, B. E. (Unpublished Draft, 2007). Predicting Interactive Search with CogTool-Explorer: An Investigation into the Order of Evaluation.  


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