Scott Steinmetz

 

Scott Steinmetz

Sage 4101

November 29, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Humans accomplish a wide variety of tasks despite operating in a complex world often inhabited by moving objects. The visual information available to us as we perform these tasks plays a large role in determining behavior such as the interception of a moving target. Within the literature the visual information available to humans can take various forms depending on the approach. Here I present work which investigates an affordance-based account which holds that humans directly perceive possible actions within the environment dependent on their body size and action capabilities. We compared an affordance-based model of moving target interception to the leading account, the constant bearing angle strategy. We conducted two experiments testing key differences in the models' predictions: (1) the decision to begin chasing a target and (2) which optical variables are crucial to performance within this task. The experimental paradigm more closely matched realistic conditions than previous studies by including targets which were uncatchable as well as introducing a score system which emulated the costs associated with pursuit. Subject behavior and performance supported the affordance-based approach

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