Jeffrey Vancouver, Professor, Department of Psychology, Ohio University

 

Jeffrey Vancouver, Professor, Department of Psychology, Ohio University

Sage 4101

October 5, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Motivation is largely about the processes that determine how humans allocate resources to the many possible activities in which one could engage (Atkinson & Birch, 1959). Much contemporary theorizing about motivation focuses on the key role of the goals individuals pursue. Indeed, one way to conceptualize motivation is in terms of understanding how individuals' goal priorities change over time. To understand that, one needs to understand how the factors that determine goal priorities change over time. Two key factors long thought relevant to goal choice are subjective value and expectancy. Recently, Vancouver, Weinhardt, and Schmidt (2010) presented a formal (i.e., computational) theory of dynamic value and expectancy, particularly as this relate to goal discrepancies (i.e., difference between current and desired state). In the following presentation, we review how the theory can account for classic and surprising phenomena found in data from ours and others dynamic paradigms

 Download the paper here. 

 

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