Ennio Mingolla, Prof & Chair Dept of Speech-Language, Northeastern University

 

Ennio Mingolla, Prof & Chair Dept of Speech-Language, Northeastern University

Sage 4101

February 25, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

While many visual recognition tasks can be solved at a glance, there are times when scrutiny is required to make fine discriminations or to break camouflage. Nuanced visual judgments often rely on a series of eye movements, as our visual systems cannot resolve subtle featural differences simultaneously across more than a few degrees of visual angle. The eyes thus tend to foveate (direct central regions, with highest resolution) sequentially on several points of interest in a visual scene. Accumulation of evidence from such effortless scanning movements involves coordinated interactions among the so-called “what” brain pathway, specialized for recognition, and the “where” pathway, specialized for processing spatial relations. The talk will describe how attentional shroud representations can act to bridge the two pathways, enabling the coherent visual exploration of surfaces of yet-to-be identified objects. A computational neural model of attentional shrouds will be described and recent simulations of  the model will be presented.

 

 Download the paper here. 

 

HD VIDEO LINK

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